Wednesday, April 1, 2020

How Many LGBTQ Kids Suffer Bullying Each Year; Only A Few States Have Specific LGBTQ Anti-Bullying Laws; Netflix's Crime Fighting Male Stripper Show; Ryan Field Books

How Many LGBTQ Kids Suffer Bullying Each Year?

I recently came across something regarding bullying in general and it made me wonder about LGBTQ kids, specifically. I don't think there's an LGBTQ person alive out there who hasn't been bullied at least once. Or, an LGBTQ person who hasn't at least worried about being bullied. We all fear it as kids. It's something we all think about while we're growing up.

What I found really interesting about bullying with regard to kids being bullied is that there is a significant difference between heteronormative kids and LGBTQ kids.

...nationwide, more U.S. high school students who self-identify as lesbian, gay, or bisexual (LGB) report having been bullied on school property (33%) and cyberbullied (27.1%) in the past year, than their heterosexual peers (17.1% and 13.3%, respectively). The study also showed that more LGB students (10%) than heterosexual students (6.1%) reported not going to school because of safety concerns.

You can read the entire piece, here. It also covers issues with regard to federal civil rights laws and sexual orientation. We need to do more now than just talking about bullying like we're all on the Oprah show. Talk, as they say, is cheap. We've moved beyond that. We need lawmakers to start writing up new laws to protect LGBTQ kids from this kind of harassment.



Only A Few States Have Specific LGBTQ Anti-Bullying Laws

According to this article, all states have anti-bullying laws, but not all have explicit protections for LGBTQ people. And that's a shame because it seems to make a difference for everyone.

"Anti-bullying laws that explicitly protect youth based on sexual orientation are associated with fewer suicide attempts among all youth, regardless of sexual orientation," the report states.

Here's a link. It goes into a lot more detail. 

One of the key factors that people tend to ignore is that many LGBTQ kids are NOT out of the closet. And they're not going to even tell you if they've been bullied. 



Netflix's Crime Fighting Male Stripper Show

I tried watching this show, Toy Boy, on Netflix, but I couldn't get past the first 20 minutes. For one thing, I don't like heteronormative shows about male strippers. I can't relate to that and I find it boring. And for another, the entire story line just seemed so contrived. 

“After seven years in a M├ílaga prison, a male stripper is released pending retrial and sets out to prove his lover framed him for her husband’s murder.”

Here's the link for more. There are a lot of average photos of men at the end of the article, and after that the comments from readers are interesting. Seems as if most gay men...like me...find this kind of thing unpalatable. And we have no interest whatsoever in watching it. Someone should tell the straight people. 









"A wonderful story that I loved. The characters were well developed, and strong. Gus: A sweet young man. Doing something for all the wrong reasons. Craig: his boyfriend, he'll go along with anything Gus say. Henry: Gus father a no nonsense man, who's husband died last year. I enjoyed this story."

Uncertainty by [Field, Ryan]

What readers said about "Altered Parts"
"Best Gay Novel In Years. This story will stay with you and you will feel you know every character and the beauty of their home in the mountains of North Carolina."



Altered Parts by [Field, Ryan]


While the book is easily readable, it also addresses emotions stereotypes and relationships. I would have preferred it be 3 times as long and tragically most guys don't find happy endings as depicted.. but in a short book, it provides food for thought, clarity and insight.. far more and better expressed than 99% of gay fiction . I don't think it could have been done better.


Kendle's Fire by Ryan Field

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