Thursday, July 3, 2014

Gay Marriage SCOTUS; Gay Rape Culture; Take Me Always by Ryan Field


Gay Marriage SCOTUS

One year after the historical SCOTUS ruling that's helped pave the way for gay marriage to become legal in some states, LGBTI advocates are planning to fight even harder in hopes that by the end of SCOTUS's next term gay marriage will be legalized throughout the nation.

Today, just a year after the Windsor decision striking down the core of the Defense of Marriage Act and the Perry decision that kept California’s Proposition 8 off the books, all major LGBT advocates support going to the Supreme Court. They plan to use the same kind of coordinated legal and public relations strategy that’s led them to 16 out of 16 victories in lower courts, including Tuesday’s in Kentucky, where a district judge appointed by President George H.W. Bush struck down the state’s gay marriage ban.

The article goes on to discuss how legalizing gay marriage has NOT caused any major disruptions in states where it has been legalized, and how the fact that public opinion has been changing SCOTUS might take this into consideration. It's a simple article with details if you're interested in knowing more about legalizing gay marriage and how the process works.


Here's more.

Gay Rape Culture


I'm linking to a highly emotional story written by a gay man who was raped in one of the most heinous ways imaginable. He talks about what it's like, about how we don't always view rape the same way, and how so much needs to be changed. I can't remember the title offhand right now, but I wrote about this once in a book. The main character was raped on his way home from work on night and this character discussed his mixed feeling about it in the sense that even though he felt violated in the worst possible way a small part of him enjoyed what was happening. One reviewer who knew nothing about rape or rape culture missed that point completely and I felt violated and insulted. But I let that go.

It's difficult to choose a section to quote because it's all so riveting. I chose this one because I think my readers read m/m romance for the happy endings. I know I grew tired of the depressing endings a long time ago. And I do realize that in m/m romance reality doesn't always ring true. But in the same respect, sometimes it does.

So much — too much — of our collective gay story is about sadness and despair and downfall. “Giovanni’s Room.” “Dancer From The Dance.” “The Normal Heart.” “Angels in America.” “My Own Private Idaho.” “Philadelphia.” “Brokeback Mountain.” “Milk.” “Weekend.” When the two hot teenage boys in “Y Tu Mamá También” hook up, it destroys their friendship. Even “Will & Grace” ended with the lifelong friendship in decades of ruin. It’s an unspoken trade-off: gays can be in pop culture as long as they’re vacuous or miserable or both, as if we’re born with the gene for sad endings (#itgetsbitter).


You can read more here.

Take Me Always
 
by Ryan Field
 
 
 
 


From an Amazon review:

 I even found myself blinking back tears at the end of the book (no, noone dies). This is a wonderful love story but it has alot of hot love scenes too.Well worth reading.


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