Thursday, March 6, 2014

Staples Closing Stores; No Men At Women's Festival; Porn Study

Staples Closing Stores

Depending on where you read about this you might get a different overall impression. But this article I'm linking to from CNET basically says that Staples is closing over two hundred brick and mortar retail stores because of strong online competition.

Staples has been making a major push for the online space. The company reported that at the end of 2013, it had more than 500,000 products available on Staples.com. At the beginning of 2013, that figure stood at 100,000.

You can read more here at CNET.

Another article I read claims Amazon is giving them a great deal of competition they can't seem to handle. And when I think about my own purchasing habits it makes sense. Instead of buying my iPad at Staples a few months ago, I bought it online through WalMart where they were offering excellent deals.

Brick and mortar bookshops are not the only ones dealing with changing times.

No Men at Women's Festival

I find this a little ironic in many ways. There's a festival in Manchester for gay women, bi women, and trans women, but no men allowed at all.

The free event is open to everyone who identifies as a lesbian, bisexual or trans woman, giving them a chance to network, attend film screenings and enjoy music, comedy, crafts and sport.

A male supporter of the LBT community told us they were disappointed and thought it was 'unfair' they could not attend.

Interesting. I guess men can support the LBT community but can still face discrimination from them and that's okay.

You can read more here.

Porn Study

This is an interesting article because it's so contradictory in so many ways. People who think porn is wrong don't think it should be illegal, or, Millennials are more likely to disagree that porn is morally wrong where older people and much younger people think it is morally wrong.

 One striking thing about these findings is the incredible variation in how people think about porn on a personal level and how they think about it on a legal level. Overall, 39 percent said they'd oppose legal restrictions on pornography, compared to the 29 percent who consider it morally acceptable.

You can check it out here.

I keep this blog rated PG and I sometimes post about male full frontal nudity in commercial films. Not in porn. In commercial mainstream films. Those posts not only receive thousands of hits in the beginning, but continue to be my leading hits for months to come. (I get the majority of my hits through *random* google searches, not social media.)

I just don't buy into these studies. They don't get into the realities we'll never know from any study because anything sex or adult related is a discreet issue and most people aren't willing to discuss it in public or in private. And, the adult entertainment industry isn't a billion dollar industry for nothing.

So much for this one.





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